You’re welcome.

In BlogX by Luke Pearson

I put this on Twitter and a few people asked for it as apparently you can’t save a gif off Twitter, so here you go. Just click on the pic and it’ll load the gif and you can download it. Enjoy.

What is Australia Day for?

In BlogX, History by Luke Pearson

According to the Australia Day website, it is a day where “we come together as a nation to celebrate what’s great about Australia and being Australian.”

Personally, I don’t see how anyone could think that the 26th of January would ever ‘bring everyone together’, or how it celebrates what’s great about Australia, or being Australian… I just don’t see it.

I think it’s great that Australia is home to some of the oldest living cultures on Earth.

Free Speech

In BlogX, Politics by Luke Pearson

Free speech isn’t something I thought about much before Andrew Bolt gave me a reason to. If I did, it was usually in reference to America, as we don’t really have Free Speech in Australia.

It is a pretty fascinating concept. It’s nothing that I can say I really care much about, but that’s only because the reality of what we have is a very long way from the virtuous concept of what it is meant to be. I could say the same of my general disinterest in the democratic process. On paper it looks great, but in practice it’s just a mockery of what it is meant to be.

There is no objectivity in media, or in life

In BlogX, Good Reads, Race & Racism by Luke Pearson

One thing I enjoy about being framed as an ‘Indigenous writer’ is that I don’t have to pretend that I’m trying to be objective. Even if I made every effort to do so not many people would believe it anyway as Indigeneity is perceived as a form of inherent bias, whereas whiteness brings with it at least the potential to feign objectivity.

I think some journalists probably try their best to be objective, those who are acutely aware of their inherent biases would be those best placed to reach a point vaguely resembling objectivity.

Changing Things I Cannot Accept

In BlogX, Race & Racism by IndigenousX

“Black Dolls, Gollywogs and Dictionaries”

A common refrain people of non-European descent hear when we voice offense or concern is “political correctness gone mad”. Somehow nostalgia and tradition have become trump cards for the continued promotion and consumption of racist paraphernalia and vernacular. It’s no wonder then that for a lot of my peers and including myself, it’s easy to fall into a routine cynicism. However this is not the way it has to be, I want to share in this piece, moments of change in 2015, where taking action and reasserting our right to not be dehumanized in public spaces or institutions has resulted in progress. The first experience is a personal one, when I was in a local Darwin chemist and stumbled across this.

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Joel Bayliss. I consider myself lucky to learn about my culture. Too many Aboriginal people missed out

In 2015, Twitter Hosts, Uncategorised by IndigenousX

My name is Joel Bayliss and I’m an Aboriginal man. My cultural ties stretch from Borroloola in the Top End, to the Arrernte lands of the central desert of the Northern Territory. I am a proud husband to Hilda, doting dad to to Ava and Isaiah.

The word identity means different things to different people. I identify as a husband, a father, a Crows and Glenelg supporter, a member of a political party and as stated before, an Aboriginal man.

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Callum Clayton-Dixon. I can’t call myself an Indigenous Australian and also say sovereignty never ceded

In 2015, Twitter Hosts by IndigenousX

What is Aboriginal sovereignty, and why are we still talking about it in 2015? To answer that question, we need to first define sovereignty in an Aboriginal context. Such a definition forms the basis of our philosophical approach to combating colonialism and reconstructing that which underpinned our society prior to colonisation.