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Jack Latimore

Jack Latimore is a Goori journalist and researcher from the Birpai nation. He writes on Indigenous affairs, politics, culture, technology, media, and journalism. His work also appears regularly in Guardian Australia and Koori Mail. He is a proud Birpai man.
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Jack Latimore
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Jack's articles

Meet Robert Young, the Koori artist designing gear for PUMA

International sports brand PUMA has teamed up with a Victorian Aboriginal artist to release a limited edition range of sportswear that celebrates the relentless spirit and diversity of First Nations cultures.

Big questions remain over the police treatment of Aboriginal protest group at Games

While there’s been plenty of questions over decisions regarding the entry of athletes in Sunday night’s closing ceremony of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, something which occurred outside the stadium involving a group of valid ticket-holders has largely been neglected by commentators and critics.

Head of Commonwealth Games Federation visits Aboriginal protest camp on Gold Coast

The top Commonwealth Games official met with Aboriginal protestors at the site of their base camp north of Surfers Paradise for around two hours yesterday to hear a range of concerns, including an account of events that occurred outside the gates of the opening ceremony last Wednesday that led to three arrests.

Five figures in the history of First Nations Media you should know about

This year, on the 6th Birthday of IndigenousX we were keen to acknowledge some of the figures, organisations and publications on whose shoulders we stand. There are many, and to be frank, without them we wouldn’t be doing what we do today.

#Apology10 – IndigenousX talks to Uncle Jack Charles

IndigenousX speaks with Uncle Jack Charles about #Apology10

#Apology10 – IndigenousX talks to Roxanne Moore

#Apology10 - IndigenousX speaks Roxanne Moore

#Apology10: Gavin Moor & Chris Dunk

IndigenousX examines #Apology10

It’s convenient to say Aboriginal people support Australia Day. But it’s not true

Opponents to Australia Day are invariably criticised in two ways. The first is a favoured manoeuvre for establishment media pundits: claim the focus on 26 January is trivial while more pressing Indigenous issues are neglected.

Forced Sedation – an assimilation policy of the Commonwealth’s “mental” health project for Indigenous people

“Mental” illness labels are increasingly greasing the wheels of shiny new cars that take people further away from Country, says LeVive.

Jack Latimore: Having Black Lives Matter in Australia can help strengthen Indigenous activism

The visit of the founders of Black Lives Matter to accept the Sydney peace prize should be leveraged by First Nations, indeed by all people of colour in Australia plus our allies and advocates, as a mechanism to have our agendas infiltrate mainstream forums at an international level and work towards redressing the raft of issues that affect us.

Review: Common People by Tony Birch

Tony Birch’s latest collection of stories is full of hard lives lived along side-tracks, on back-roads, in cobbled bluestone allies and laneways.

Do you know your rights this World Indigenous Day?

Today is World Indigenous Day and because #WeAreIndigenous we’re celebrating with this timely reminder of our rights as set forth in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Brought to you with the support of Kalinya Communications and Amnesty International Australia.

  Calling all Blak and deadly comic artists!

IndigenousX’s first ComiX Competition is now accepting submissions IndigenousX is looking to unearth Indigenous comic illustrators whose work seeks to redefine how our mob are represented in media and society.

Diverse Black voices part of Sydney Festival

"By putting a whole range of projects together that mark out some kind of broad perimeter that Aboriginality can exist inside of, it’s offering more than a tick-the-box example, or a single way of thinking of our world. We’re pulling Aboriginality out in lots of different directions because we are more diverse. And no one else gets to define who we are. We get to define who we are," says 2017 festival director Wesley Enoch.

The Fake News Frenzy: it compromises the information that Blackfellas rely upon too

Social media users are perfectly aware that they’re ensconced in a bubble, and prefer it that way. It is a wilful ignorance. Conflicting perspectives, regardless of their substance, are flatly rejected or simply blocked. Self-affirmation is the objective. And in a climate of socioeconomic disenfranchisement and political disaffection, that participation imparts a measure of agency. This is the much vaunted democratising affordance of social media, and a cruel irony.

Why another Royal Commission when the recommendations of the last one continue to gather dust?

Last Monday night, the ABC's 4 Corners program directed the nation's attention to the horrific violations occurring within the Northern Territory's juvenile justice system. A series of leaked images taken from inside the Don Dale Youth Detention Centre revealed that Aboriginal boys as young as 13 had endured forms of torture comparable to the abuses committed against inmates of the notorious Abu Ghraib prison.

Stolen Generations — 21st anniversary of launch of Inquiry, 17 years since report

It has been 21 years since the launch of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, and 17 years since the release of the inquiry’s final report –now commonly known as the Bringing Them Home report– which concluded with the troubling finding that a generation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders “endured gross violations of their human rights. These violations continue to affect Indigenous people’s daily lives. They were an act of genocide, aimed at wiping out Indigenous families, communities, and cultures”.

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