The Changes to the National Curriculum have Nothing to do with Education

There has been some, but not a lot, of talk recently about the announced changes to the National Curriculum; a ‘greater emphasis’ on ‘our Christian heritage’, and a removal of any specific reference to Indigenous people (and migrants) from various parts of the curriculum, for example, in ‘Contributions to our society’ in Year 6.


Another Government Review. Another Disappointment.

According to a recent article in The Australian, “Indigenous issues have been cut from parts of the curriculum, and students will no longer be taught about Harmony Week, “National Reconciliation Week, or NAIDOC (National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee) week… The Year 6 study of the contribution of “individuals and groups” to Australian society will no longer include a reference to indigenous people or migrants, and will be confined to the post-Federation period.”

<em>Educator and parent, Leesa Watego, reflects on these changes, and what they tell us about Australia’s inability to understand and respect the Indigenous peoples, cultures, and histories.


Paperless Arrest Leads To Undignified Passing Of Warlpiri Artist

Kumanjayi Langdon was a proud Warlpiri man from Yuendumu.

He was an artist who contributed to his community and culture. He wrote and illustrated children’s books and posters, and had worked at Yurrampi Crafts as a designer. His public mural of the local footy team, the Yuendumu Magpies, is in the middle of town. One of his paintings hangs in the National Gallery of Victoria.


Crowdfunding the Gap

As many Indigenous specific programs and services continue to downsize or disappear altogether due to Federal and State governments cutting funding and withdrawing support, many are turning to the online community to keep their doors open.

Crowdfunding is a great tool for raising funds for one off events, campaigns, or projects. It is also great for startups who aspire to make themselves sustainable but need that initial capital to get the ball rolling; but can it be an effective means of maintaing essential services and programs designed to impact positively on the lives of Indigenous people?


Tony Abbott Is Not The Prime Minister For Indigenous Affairs.

Tony Abbott calling himself the PM for Indigenous Affairs is similar to my young niece calling herself Batman. It was fairly cute at first, but after the hundredth time she has punched me and ran away screaming ‘I’m Batman!!’, the joke is wearing kinda thin.